Indie Author - Chicki Brown

Indie Author - Chicki Brown

IndieReads: When did you start writing?

Chicki Brown: When I was in middle school, the first romance I’d ever read was Fifteen by Beverly Cleary. As an avid reader, I naturally wanted to try my hand at creating my own fiction and constantly wrote stories adolescent romances and mysteries. But unfortunately I allowed life to distract me, and I didn’t write again until 2000.

IR: What genre do you write in the most, and what is it about the genre that attracts you?

CB: I write women’s fiction and romance, my favorite genres to read. Nothing fascinates me more than interpersonal relationships whether they are between a man and a woman, between friends or between family members.

IR: What was the prime motivation in publishing your works through independent channels?

CB: I had been writing for ten years, and after two agents and countless close calls, I decided I couldn’t take the traditional roller coaster any longer. Since I started writing seriously later in life, I don’t have years to wait around for editors to get back to me on submissions. LOL! When I learned about Amazon’s direct publishing program, it sounded like the perfect option for me.

IR: What were your early experiences like?

CB: July will make one year that I’ve been e-publishing, so I guess these are my early experiences! It has been a lot of hard work, but it’s the best thing I’ve ever done in my life. It has not only proven to me that I could do the entire publishing process myself, but my sales have shown me that people actually want to read what I’ve written. Now I can stick my tongue out at those evil little voices in my head that said I couldn’t do it.

I’ve also learned that nothing takes the place of preparation. The first book I published was actually the fifth one I’d written, so I had put in the writing time long before my debut release. In addition, I had studied the industry for years and tried my best to learn as much as I could to stay on top of the incredible metamorphosis of this industry.

IR: Have you seen a change in the independent publishing community?

CB: Most definitely. When I first started writing, the majority of self-published authors I knew were those folks who hawked their paper books on their web site (if they had one) and lugged them around in the trunks of their cars. They didn’t have any other choice, because the big bookstores wouldn’t give them the time of day.
Now with the advent of e-readers like Kindle, Nook, Sony Reader and iPad, there are authors like Joe Konrath, Amanda Hocking and Barry Eisler who are making big money self-publishing.
Another thing I’ve realized is that the readers on indie books are much more open-minded than traditional readers, at least when it comes to romance and women’s fiction. The books indie readers buy don’t need the “blessing” of RWA or have the logo of a major romance publisher.
When an author uploads a book to Kindle or Nook, she categorizes it herself. Readers find them by what they enjoy reading. If they like the description, they buy it. If my books had been tucked away in the African-American section of the bookstores, the thousands of wonderful readers who have purchased my three releases would never have found them.

IR: Do you read other independently published authors works? Any favorites you would like to plug?

Have You Seen Her? by Chicki Brown

Have You Seen Her? by Chicki Brown

CB: Yes. There are so many, but Erin Kern, Philip Thomas Duck, Margaret Lake, Tiphanie Thomas, Maureen Miller, Valerie Maarten, Alisha Paige, Sibel Hodge, and William Potter are just a few.

IR: Where are you most likely to purchase indie works?

CB: Amazon.com or BarnesandNoble.com!, the two sources where my own books are available for sale.
To date Amazon has been the most profitable for me. My sales there outnumber B&N 30 to 1.

IR: Do you have any advice for someone who would like to be an Indie author or publisher?

CB: This is something I can talk about for days, but for the sake of time and space, I’ll give you my top four points.

* Don’t take any shortcuts. Learn all you can about the craft of writing and the current state of the industry,

* read the formatting guides carefully for each site where you upload your work,

* follow those online who are very successful in e-publishing. Author Joe Konrath has one of the best blogs in existence on the subject of electronic publishing. There are many other sources of up-to-date information such as Huffington Post Books, The Writer’s Guide to E-Publishing (WG2E), and Publetariat.

* Learn to make real connections with other writers online. Share information and don’t just push your own books all the time.

IR: Do you have any new works coming out soon that you can tell us about?

CB: Sure do! My first inspirational novel, I Can’t Get Next to You, is coming out in August. It’s an edgy story of a man who falls in love with a woman who is considered completely wrong for him. He’s a committed Christian. She’s an exotic dancer. Enough said?

IR: Is there anything you would like to share?

CB: The reading community is becoming more and more polarized. There is a lot of screaming and hollering by the people I like to call the “cold, dead handers,” those who swear they will die before they read an e-book. They pontificate about the feel and smell of books, and they refuse to see that things have to change. E-books will soon be the major reading format whether they like the idea or not. I want to remind them that nobody died when the car replaced the horse and buggy or when families began sitting around the television instead of the radio. Or when 8-tracks replaced reel-to-reels then cassettes replaced 8-track then CDs replaced cassettes then MP3’s replaced CDs. What’s important are the stories not the format. We always adjust to change, and change can be very good.

More Info:

Chicki Brown is the author of three published novels. She is currently working on her first series, a family saga, yet untitled.

An avid reader, her favorite authors are Beverly Jenkins, Eric Jerome Dickey, Lisa Kleypas, J.R. Ward and Suzanne Brockmann.

A New Jersey native, Brown and her family relocated to suburban Atlanta, Georgia in 1994, and she now proudly calls herself a “Georgia peach.”

Her many homes in cyberspace include http://www.chicki663.webs.com, http://www.facebook.com/chicki.brown and @Chicki 663 on Twitter.

Hollywood Swinging by Chicki Brown

Hollywood Swinging by Chicki Brown

Newlywed author Shontae Nichols Burke is trying to adjust to her life in Hollywood as the wife of actor Devon Burke, one of the film industry’s brightest upcoming stars. She’s left her home and her friends and moved to Los Angeles.

They both have blossoming careers. She’s attending movie premieres and living a life she only dreamed of.

Unknown to Shontae, someone else also believes Devon Burke is the love of her life. When this disturbed woman insinuates herself into their lives, Shontae learns that all Hollywood drama isn’t scripted and finds herself in a fight for her marriage that’s worthy of the big screen.

Indie Author - William Todd Rose

Indie Author - William Todd Rose

IndieReads: When did you start writing?

 

William Todd Rose: I started seriously writing when I was in the ninth grade or so. I’d always had an interest in it and loved creating stories for class projects and what have you, but I’d never really considered it anything more than just something I did for fun. Then I began to realize that other people enjoyed reading what I wrote as much as I enjoyed creating it and threw myself into it with sheer abandon. By the time I was in my sophmore year of high school, I’d completed two novels and represented my school in various writing contests. What’s funny though is that I struggled for years to get published and then, after my first acceptance in my early twenties, I simply quit writing all together. I put down the pen and didn’t take it up again for over fifteen years. So I’ve got a lot of lost time to make up for.

IR: Are you self published or did you use an independent publisher?

WTR: Both. I initially started off self publishing, but a few of my works caught the eye of some indie presses. Living Dead Press picked up my short story collection Sex in The Time of Zombies and Library of the Living Dead Press will soon be releasing The Dead & Dying. In addition to this, the expanded second edition of The 7 Habits of Highly Infective People should be available from Permuted Press later in the year.

IR: What genre do you write in the most?

WTR: I try not to limit myself to a single genre, preferring the broader term “speculative fiction”. That being said, most of my work is pretty dark. There are elements of horror and scifi, but it’s also tinged now and then with somewhat surreal passages.

IR: What is it about that genre that attracts you?

WTR: As far as speculative fiction goes, I look the openess of it. I’m just as much into cyberpunk and scifi as I am horror and the apocalypse and I like the freedom of being able to write about whatever subject catches my attention.

IR: How many books have you published?

WTR: Counting ebooks and novellas, eight. As I mentioned earlier, however, two of them won’t be available until later this year.

IR: Which one should people start with?

WTR: Normally, I would suggest The 7 Habits of Highly Infective People, but the second edition won’t be out for a while. So I suppose it would really depend on what you’re into. If you like zombies, then you should definitely check out Sex in The Time of Zombies, which is an exploration of the roles sex and sexuality might play in an undead uprising. If you like your apocalypse zombie-free then Cry Havoc or Apocalyptic Organ Grinder. And Shut the Fuck Up and Die! would be for anyone who might like a brutal, grindhouse inspired tale.

IR: What was the prime motivation in publishing your work through independent channels?

WTR: Freedom. When I decided to self publish Shadow of the Woodpile, I liked the idea of having full creative control over the project. With that book, I was trying to blend the horror genre with the narrative style of 50s Beat writers like Jack Kerouac and William S. Burroughs. I definitely didn’t want someone telling me I couldn’t use a run on sentence or that many conjunctions. It was stream of consciousness stuff that I just wanted to flow with.

IR: What were your early experiences like?

WTR: All in all, they were pretty good. I may have been a bit naive going into self publishing and not realized at first exactly how much work is involved. But it’s definitely worth it.

IR: What did the process teach you?

WTR: Not to give up. To believe in yourself and your work. And that the old adage “measure twice, cut once” can also apply to the book publishing world as well.

IR: Have you seen a change in the independent publishing community?

WTR: I definitely feel the community is becoming more cohesive and that, as a whole, our voices are getting louder. More and more people are starting to take notice. And that’s what I really want to see … a change in the reading community. There’s so much talent out there that most people will never hear about because they stick with “brand names”. And it’s not entirely their fault. For a long time, the indie author has gotten an unfair rep. We’ve been called everything from vanity writers to hacks and it’s sometimes implied that we self-publish only because no one else is willing to publish us. Which couldn’t be further from the truth. Writing is the only medium I can think of where the independent artist is , by many, disdained. Indie filmmakers and indie bands are both held in high esteem, so why isn’t that same courtesy extended to authors? After all, I can’t imagine anyone calling Tarantino a “vanity director”.

IR: Do you read other independently published authors works?

WTR: It’s really about all I read anymore, other than the books which inspired me to write to begin with and never get old no matter how many times I read

Shadow of the Woodpile by William Todd Rose

Shadow of the Woodpile by William Todd Rose

them.

 

IR: Any favorites you would like to plug?

WTR: Where to start? David Dunwoody, Tonia Brown, Carl Hose, Eric S. Brown, Jonathan Moon, Timothy Long, Rhiannon Frater, David Moody . . . I could just keep going and going, so feel free to stop me at anytime.

IR: Where are you most likely to purchase indie works?

WTR: The internet mostly. It’s harder to find indie works in brick in mortar stores, at least where I live. My wife and I have actually discussed, at some point down the road, opening a small bookstore that only stocks indie authors. No bestsellers, no pablum. Just pure, creative goodness.

IR: Where can people find your books and which source has been the must successful for you?

WTR: Right now, my books can be found at most online retailers and e-books also available at Smashwords. Smashwords, in particular, has been really good to me. It’s a great vehicle for getting your work into the hands of people who’ve never heard of you. I like to release freebies every so often and Smashwords is perfect for that. Sex in the Time of Zombies actually started out as a free download before it caught the attention of Living Dead Press and right now I’m offering Apocalyptic Organ Grinder for free as well. Not only have I picked up new fans through that venue, but a few of them have turned out to be really good friends as well. So it’s a win-win, no matter how you look at it.

IR: Do you have books in print? Where can we find them? What was that experience like?

WTR: Shadow of the Woodpile, Cry Havoc and Sex In The Time Of Zombies are all currently available in print, with The Dead & Dying and The 7 Habits of Highly Infective People soon to follow.

IR: Do you have any advice for some one who would like to be an Indie author or publisher?

WTR: Don’t underestimate the power of networking with other indie writers. They’re a great bunch of people and, as a general rule, are usually more than willing to give advice to those who are newer to the game. When I went to my first convention as a vendor, David Dunwoody and Machina, in particular, were godsends. They helped explain the ropes to me, what I could expect from the convention goers, marketing techniques, that sort of thing. We can all benefit from one another’s experiences and that not only builds a strong community, but stronger writers as well.

IR: Do you do your own cover art or do you have some one do it for you?

WTR: When I self publish, I do my own art. That ties in with what I was saying about full creative control. I want everything — from the story itself to the formatting to the cover — to be a unified piece of art. It also helps keep me focused. If I reach a part of the plot where I need to think things through, I’ll pull up Photoshop and work on the cover while I turn things over in my head.

IR: Do you have any new works coming out soon that you can tell us about?

WTR: Very, very soon I have The Dead & Dying coming out from Library of the Living Dead Press. I kind of consider this to be an existential zombie novel. Like the majority of my undead themed work, the story isn’t so much about the zombies as it is the people who find their worlds turned upside down and are just struggling to survive. Later in the year, will see the re-release of The 7 Habits of Highly Infectivge People, which is a tale of contagion, drugs, time travel, and the living dead. Further down the road, I’ll be releasing a print version of Shut the Fuck Up and Die! and I’ve also got three or four other books I’m currently working on, but none of them are close enough to completion yet to really count.

IR: Is there anything you would like to share?

WTR: Links to all my work, including free fiction are available on my website, www.williamtoddrose.com I’m also on Facebook and love hearing from my readers, so feel free to hit me up with a friend request and drop me a line.

More Info:

William Todd Rose is a speculative fiction author currently residing in Parkersburg, West Virginia. His short works have appeared in a various magazines and anthologies, as well as having been featured on several podcasts. To date, his full length novels include the experimental horror novella “Shadow of the Woodpile”, the apocalyptic thriller “Cry Havoc”, and “The 7 Habits of Highly Infective People: A Novel of Contagion, Drugs, Time Travel, & the Living Dead”. A second, expanded edition of “The 7 Habits” will be released in 2011 by Permuted Press as well as the Library of the Living Dead Press publication of his novel “The Dead & Dying”.

Cry Havoc by  William Todd Rose

Cry Havoc by William Todd Rose

The city is embroiled in chaos: street fights rage with the ferocity of urban warfare, buildings burn unchecked, and blood flows along the sidewalks. Though they can see the anarchy through their windows, two couples struggle to maintain a sense of normality within the confines of their home, never dreaming of the lengths some of them will go to just to stay alive.

 

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IndieReads: When did you start writing?

Joan P. Cooley: I started writing poetry when I was seven years old. I later advanced to writing short stories. I then turned several of those stories into novels and I have been plugging away at the craft ever since.

IR: Are you self published or did you use an independent publisher?

JPC: I am self published via Amazon Kindle.

IR: What genre do you write in the most?

JPC: I mainly write fantasy romance novels.

IR: What is it about that genre that attracts you?

JPC: I adore the emotional drama involved when love comes alive. And I really enjoy putting two interesting people together in a romantic environment. Adding the fantasy elements allows me to throw in whatever paranormal or supernatural plot twists that I desire, for just the right backdrop.

IR: How many books have you published?

JPC: Only one, so far. Rock Charisma is my first published novel.

IR: Which one should people start with?

JPC: Rock Charisma is the first novel in a series that I have planned, about the adventures of a famous rock band. So, that’s a good book to begin with.

IR: What was the prime motivation in publishing your work through independent channels?

JPC: Independent publishing gives me the freedom to write exactly what I want, without filters. The creative control that self publishing brings is quite liberating. And I wouldn’t have it any other way.

IR: What were your early experiences like?

JPC: I am a full-fledged Army brat, practically born in the barracks. Both of my parents were in the military, so I grew up traveling a lot and living on Army bases. It was a unique childhood, often having to leave what was familiar and putting down new roots all of the time.

IR: What did the process teach you?

Rock Charisma by Joan P. Cooley

Rock Charisma by Joan P. Cooley

JPC: I learned early on not to be afraid of change. For that is the only constant in life. I embrace new experiences quite easily.

IR: Have you seen a change in the independent publishing community?

JPC: Yes. I think the bar has been raised for indie authors. More readers have come to expect excellent written content from us. And we’ve delivered. So, there is a definite atmosphere of pride. The indie publishing community is thriving right now, with better quality writing than was previously offered.

IR: Do you read other independently published authors works?

JPC: Indeed, I do. When I have the time.

IR: Any favorites you would like to plug?

JPC: I loved Celtic Evil by Sierra Rose. That book contains some amazing writing from an extremely talented author. I also enjoyed reading Have You Seen Her? by Chicki Brown. It’s a well written contemporary romance novel about a heroine who escapes domestic violence. Ladies And Gentlemen…The Redeemers by Michael Scott Miller is another great music-themed novel. In the story, a down and out homeless manager organizes a group of street musicians to form a band. Together, they overcome the odds to attain success. I really enjoyed cheering for the underdog in that one.

IR: Where are you most likely to purchase indie works?

JPC: I usually purchase indie works online, at Amazon.com.

IR: Where can people find your books and which source has been the must successful for you?

JPC: Right now, Rock Charisma is exclusively available at Amazon.com and the book has been selling pretty steadily over there.

IR: Do you have books in print?

JPC: I don’t have any books published in print, at this time. Rock Charisma is only available as an ebook.

IR: Do you have any advice for some one who would like to be an Indie author or publisher?

JPC: Research, explore options, and read about independent publishing before you dive into the waters. Being prepared makes the experience a lot more fun.

IR: Do you do your own cover art or do you have some one do it for you?

JPC: I create all of my book covers at this stage, which makes the process less expensive and certainly more convenient when I need to make changes. But, I might hire a designer later on.

IR: Do you have any new works coming out soon that you can tell us about?

JPC: Well, the sequel to Rock Charisma is already finished and the book is in its final editing phase. I will probably release the second novel before fall. And I’m currently working on a third book in the Rock Charisma series. You’ve gotta love those rock stars!

IR: Is there anything you would like to share?

JPC: I’d just like to thank all of the wonderful authors who encouraged me to independently publish and helped me learn the ropes. I couldn’t have done any of it without their support and advice.

More Info:

Joan P. Cooley is the author of the rock-themed fantasy romance novel ROCK CHARISMA. She has been an avid reader and writer for most of her life.

Joan began writing poetry when she was seven years old and soon graduated to short stories. She later expanded several of those stories into novels, and she has been plugging away at the craft ever since.

ROCK CHARISMA is her first published novel. She resides in Atlanta, Georgia and Joan enjoys attending rock concerts in her free time.

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Rock Charisma by Joan P. Cooley

Rock Charisma by Joan P. Cooley

A ruthless rock star with a secret meets his match, when a beautiful blonde reporter is assigned to interview him.

A sexy, fast-paced rock n’ roll fantasy…

Janet Reed…the L.A. Times’ top-notch investigative reporter.

Dale Rhodes…the biggest rock star in the world.

He hated reporters. And he harbored a terrifying secret.

She despised rock n’ roll. But, she smelled a story. And her nose was never wrong.

It was a match made in hell! Sparks fly when the couple collides in a backstage hallway…

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Indie Author - Theresa Ragan

Indie Author - Theresa Ragan

IndieReads.net: When did you start writing?

 

Theresa Ragan: I had no idea I wanted to be a writer until I was pregnant with my fourth child and my sister handed me a romance novel. That was in 1992. After reading Jude Deveraux’s A Knight in Shining Armor, I knew what I wanted to do with my life. For a few hours I had been taken away to another world and I loved it. I wanted to provide that sort of escapism to busy moms everywhere. I began researching medieval times and reading romance novels. I spent a lot of time at the library. I was working full time, raising four kids, and I couldn’t stop writing. That’s when I knew I was a writer. I had found my passion. Five years later, when my youngest daughter was entering kindergarten, I finished my first book, Return of the Rose, and started mailing out query letters to agents and editors.

IR: Are you self published or did you use an independent publisher?

TR: I made the decision to self-publish in February, 2011. I was waiting for my agent to read my latest book…a thriller. While I waited, I read the very first book I had written and I had an epiphany. NO MORE WAITING. I was done. The idea to self-publish hit me hard and fast. Never before had I entertained the idea of self-publishing. For two decades I had a dream of seeing my book at Borders or Barnes & Noble or any bookstore. I had written ten 400-page novels and too many proposals to count. I was and still am a member of Romance Writers of America and through RWA I met many wonderful writer friends. I also learned a lot about writing. I finaled in RWA’s Golden Heart competition six times. It was a great ride. And now, suddenly, I had to adjust my thinking. I emailed my agent and told her I was going to self-publish and therefore I wanted/needed to end our contract. It was a strange and exciting week.

IR: What genre do you write in the most?

TR: In the beginning, I intended to write only medieval time travels. When my first two books didn’t sell to a NY publisher, I decided to try romantic comedy since I loved reading in that genre. Four romantic comedies later and still no sale, I wrote a romantic suspense novel or two. Then a thriller, which is my most recently finished novel. I loved writing every single book. Well, that’s not completely true. The thriller was sort of a strange experience for me. I wrote the first 150 pages and then I had to put the book away for a few months. I was having nightmares since the story deals with a serial killer. I was spending a lot of time researching and thinking about killers and it was getting to me. I wasn’t even sure if I would get back to the book even though my agent loved the first 150 pages and wanted more. When I finally went back to it, the whole thinking about killers was no longer a problem. I don’t know why. I am very excited about this book.

IR: What is it about that genre that attracts you?

TR: All of the genres attract me. I love the idea of a modern-day person going back in time. I also love reading about two people meeting and falling in love against all odds. I also like seeing the good guy win! I plan to keep writing in all genres.

IR: How many books have you published?

TR: So far I have published four books. They are all between 360 and 400 pages. Return of the Rose, A Knight in Central Park, Taming Mad Max, and Finding Kate Huntley.

IR: Which one should people start with?

TR: If you like adventurous and fun medieval time travels, start with Return of the Rose or A Knight in Central Park. If you like romantic comedies start with Taming Mad Max. If you prefer romantic suspense go with Finding Kate Huntley–my hero crash lands a plane and there’s a lot of fast-paced action. If you like thrillers my book, ABDUCTED, will be out May, 2011! (ed note: available now!)

IR: What was the prime motivation in publishing your work through independent channels?

TR: I was tired of waiting for other people to decide my books’ fate. I don’t like the idea of 20 or 30 editors deciding if my stories deserve to be read. For 19 years I was told that time travels don’t sell. I was hoping to sell 10 of each book. My two time travels have sold 10,000 ebooks in under ten weeks. I am thrilled with my decision.

IR: What were your early experiences like?

TR: Writing. Waiting. Editor calling. Agent calling. Waiting. Writing. Submitting. Excited. Bummed. Waiting. Writing. Waiting. Writing. More waiting…

IR: What did the process teach you?

TR: The long journey taught me that everything happens in its own time. For years writer friends were being published all around me. I was always happy for them because I figured if publishers were still buying new authors, then I still had a chance. But now I feel so lucky to have NOT published through the traditional route. I like having control of my cover art, my content, my marketing and promotion. I love being an indie author. It’s a lot of work, but that’s okay. I’ve never been happier. I might actually be able to stay home full time and write novels…my dream come true.

IR: Have you seen a change in the independent publishing community?

Abducted by Teresa Ragan

Abducted by Teresa Ragan

TR: Yes. This is a crazy time right now in the book industry. Remember when musicians didn’t want anything to do with Itunes? Eventually, they saw the light.

IR: Do you read other independently published authors works?

TR: Yes. I wish I had more time to read more of them. Right now I am reading Norah Wilson’s The Case of the Flashing Fashion Queen: A Dix Dodd Mystery. You can buy it at Amazon and Smashwords. The chemistry between the two main characters is great.

IR: Any favorites you would like to plug?

TR: Too many to name just one.

IR: Where are you most likely to purchase indie works?

TR: Amazon.

IR: Where can people find your books and which source has been the must successful for you?

TR: Readers can find my books on Amazon, Return of the Rose and Smashwords. I have high hopes for all of my books. My two medieval time travels were released March, 2011, and have exceeded all expectations. A Knight in Central Park hit #65 in kindle books for a few days in April. I was selling 550 books a day! That was exciting. I have no expectations. I am just enjoying the ride.

IR: Do you have any advice for some one who would like to be an Indie author or publisher?

TR: Go for it! If you don’t love your books, you can’t expect anyone else to love them. Listen to your instincts on everything…content, cover art, price, etc. Hire someone to format your book if you don’t have time. Keep writing and always believe in yourself.

IR: Do you do your own cover art or do you have some one do it for you?

TR: I hired Dara England at http://mycoverart.wordpress.com. She makes custom designs for $50 and she’s fast!

IR: Do you have any new works coming out soon that you can tell us about?

TR: ABDUCTED is my first thriller and most recent book. It will be out in a few weeks and I’m excited about this book because I think it’s my best work. Elizabeth Gardner (Lizzy) is seventeen when she tells her parents she’s going out with her girlfriends. Instead, she meets up with Jared Shayne, her boyfriend of two years. As she walks home beneath an inky black sky, her perfect night becomes her worst nightmare.

Twelve years later, Lizzy is a licensed PI known as the “one who got away”. When she’s not searching for runaway teenagers, working on insurance scams, or talking to her therapist, she’s at the local high school teaching young girls to defend themselves. But her world is turned upside down for the second time after she receives a call from Jared Shayne. He’s an FBI Special Agent now and he needs her help. Lizzy has no plans to get involved. Not until Jared tells her the kidnapper left her a personalized note.

IR: Is there anything you would like to share?

TR: I wish all aspiring writers much success!

I can be reached at www.theresaragan.com or theresaragan@gmail.com

Thanks for the interview, Shawn.

More Info:

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A Knight in Central Park by Theresa Ragan

A Knight in Central Park by Theresa Ragan

The year is 1499. As Alexandra Dunn’s farmhouse is set ablaze, her grandfather places precious stones in her palm, telling her she has until the next full moon to return with a hero…a brave, chivalrous knight to help save her family. Familiar objects become a blur as she is swallowed in darkness. Suddenly Alexandra is standing in the middle of Central Park, but she has no time to ponder on the wondrous powers of the stones or the amazing sights before her…she must find a hero before all is lost.

Joe McFarland would be the first to admit that he’s far from hero material…definitely not the man she’s looking for. A firm believer of quietude and non-violence, he avoids conflict at all costs. At thirty-four, he is one of the younger Professors at NYU where he lectures and teaches History: The High Middle Ages. Joe’s main goal in life is to gain membership into the Medieval Academy, a highly distinguished group of archaeologists and historians. He believes membership will bring him respect and recognition…but what he really wants is to be reunited with his father; a man who has spent his entire life searching for the Black Knight, the last of the medieval knights.

Joe’s organized, well-structured life begins to unravel the moment he meets Alexandra Dunn. He figures she majored in medieval history before going off the deep end…until days later when he is miraculously transported through time, to 1499 England. Dressed in Dockers and a button down shirt, Joe thought he was ready for anything…anything but this! An armored man with a very authentic looking broadsword is about to strike him down. With only nail clippers and a Bic to defend himself, Joe has no time to think about such an implausible phenomenon as traveling through time…not if he wants to live to see another day.

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Indie Author - G. P. Ching

Indie Author - G. P. Ching

IndieReads.net: When did you start writing?

G.P. Ching: I’ve written stories all of my life. The first book I remember writing was titled The Dog Who Ate Pancakes and I was about six. I wanted to be an author for as long as I can remember but didn’t pursue it because somewhere along the line it was drilled into me that writing was not a practical career. I’m thankful for my fate, however, because my background in business is helping me immensely now that I’m published.

IR: Are you self published or did you use an independent publisher?

GPC: I am self-published via an author cooperative called DarkSide publishing (www.darksidepublishing.com)

IR: What genre do you write in the most?

GPC: I write Young Adult Paranormal novels.

IR: What is it about that genre that attracts you?

GPC: I think the most interesting thing about people are the parts of their character that strain against the boundaries of normalcy. Paranormal fiction is the perfect platform for exaggerating these qualities to create entertaining and thought provoking fiction.

IR: How many books have you published?

GPC: The Soulkeepers is my first full length novel. I also have a short story in the 100 Stories for Queensland Anthology and several others in literary magazines. My first published writing was short fiction.

IR: Which one should people start with?

GPC: The Soulkeepers.

IR: What was the prime motivation in publishing your work through independent channels?

GPC: I’d workshopped The Soulkeepers and was told by an editor it was the best manuscript he’d seen at any conference. Despite this feedback, as well as the positive reviews of a whopping eleven beta readers, I was rejected by over twenty agents, many with personalized, positive comments. I was burnt out on hearing how great the book was BUT…. I wanted readers to have a crack at it.

IR: What were your early experiences like?

GPC: I have no regrets. The Soulkeepers is a profitable venture both financially and emotionally and I’ve been on cloud nine since my first review.

IR: What did the process teach you?

GPC: One thing I’ve learned is to ask for reviews before the book is published. I waited until The Soulkeepers was for sale before making my first review request which delayed spreading the word. Reviewers are an important link to readers.

IR: Have you seen a change in the independent publishing community?

GPC: I can’t remember a time when there were more self-published books on the market or when those books did so well.

IR: Do you read other independently published authors works?

GPC: Yes. I’ve enjoyed many indies and buy as many as I can to support the cause.

IR: Any favorites you would like to plug?

GPC: My favorites are the other DarkSide authors, obviously. Megg Jensen, Karly Kirkpatrick, and Angela Carlie.

IR: Where are you most likely to purchase indie works?

The Soulkeepers by G. P. Ching

The Soulkeepers by G. P. Ching

GPC: Amazon.com because I own a kindle.

IR: Where can people find your books and which source has been the must successful for you?

GPC: Amazon, Barnes & Nobles and Smashwords. I have sold almost exactly the same number of copies between Amazon and Barnes and Noble and have had a strong showing on Smashwords ,too. I actually wish my customers were more sales channel specific sometimes because my ranking would be better.

IR: Do you have books in print? Where can we find them? What was that experience like?

GPC: The Soulkeepers is available in paperback from Amazon or Barnes & Nobles on-line. Only a small fraction of my sales are paperbacks.

IR: Do you have any advice for some one who would like to be an Indie author or publisher?

GPC: Keep profitability in mind. Many new authors spend way too much money upfront when a little time and elbow grease would land them the same results or better. Do your research and don’t fall for pricy add-ons that you don’t need.

IR: Do you do your own cover art or do you have some one do it for you?

GPC: I paid for the cover art for The Soulkeepers and I love how it turned out but I plan to do my own cover art from now on. I’ve decided to make the change because I’m a fairly artistic person and I believe I can produce a quality cover. Plus, the flexibility that doing it myself affords me is worth the trouble. I want to be able to publish my books as soon as they are ready and I can’t do that if I’m waiting to have it formatted or for the cover design.

IR: Do you have any new works coming out soon that you can tell us about?

GPC: The second book in The Soulkeepers series, Medicine Woman is coming in the Fall of 2011. I also have a stand alone novel called Grounded that is slated for Winter 2011. You can read more about these upcoming releases at http://genevieveching.blogspot.com.

IR: Is there anything you would like to share?

GPC: Readers can follow me on Facebook, Twitter or at http://genevieveching.blogspot.com

More Info:

G. P. Ching is a short fiction writer turned novelist and rebel suburbanite who makes wicked cookies, kicks patootie at Guitar Hero, and thinks guinea pigs are the perfect pet. She lives in Illinois with her husband and two children. Visit her at www.gpching.com.

The Soulkeepers by G. P. Ching

The Soulkeepers by G. P. Ching

When fifteen-year-old Jacob Lau is pulled from the crumpled remains of his mother’s car, no one can explain why he was driving or why the police can’t find his mother’s body. Made a ward of his uncle and thousands of miles from home, a beautiful and mysterious neighbor, Dr. Abigail Silva, offers to use her unique abilities to help him find his mom. In exchange, she requires Jacob to train as a Soulkeeper, a biologically gifted warrior charged with protecting human souls. He agrees to her demands, desperate for any clue to the mystery of his mother’s disappearance. But soon Jacob finds himself trapped in a web of half-truths, and questions Dr. Silva’s motives for helping him.

 

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